I want to love, but my hair smells of war and running and running.
- Warsan Shire (via splitterherzen)

(Source: carryonanyway, via 930310)



magictransistor:

Lāhor ( لہور | لاہور‎ ); Mughal City of Gardens, ca. 1890s.

magictransistor:

Lāhor ( لہور | لاہور‎ ); Mughal City of Gardens, ca. 1890s.

(via fuckyeahsouthasia)

In fiction, plenty do the job of conveying information, rousing suspense, painting characters, enabling them to speak. But only certain sentences breathe and shift about, like live matter in soil.
- Jhumpa Lahiri, The Interpreter of Maladies  (via velamag)

(via khinaye)


ancientpeoples:

Stone panel from the North-West Palace of Ashurnasirpal II (Court D, no. 7)
Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), northern IraqNeo-Assyrian
c. 883-859 BC
This relief panel comes from the walls of the courtyard which led to the throne room of the Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BC). It was positioned next to a side-door through which his throne was sometimes visible.
Although many of the sculptures decorating the palace depicted magical spirits, away from the main central door and buttresses the scenes in the courtyard were secular. This scene was part of series showing a group of foreigners bringing tribute. Their dress shows that they were from the west. The turban suggests one man is from north-western Syria, his clenched fists are a token of submission. At this time Assyria was expanding westward to acquired booty and tribute from states in the geographical region of Syria. The man with monkeys may be Phoenician. They bring luxury goods and status symbols. The monkeys may have come from Egypt or from the lands of southern Arabia from which incense was imported.
Mesopotamian kings prided themselves in the collections of exotic animals they acquired as booty or tribute. Monkeys were popular animals in the art of Mesopotamia. They were often depicted playing musical instruments, perhaps representing animals accompanying travelling entertainers. 
Source: British Museum

ancientpeoples:

Stone panel from the North-West Palace of Ashurnasirpal II (Court D, no. 7)

Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), northern Iraq
Neo-Assyrian

c. 883-859 BC

This relief panel comes from the walls of the courtyard which led to the throne room of the Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BC). It was positioned next to a side-door through which his throne was sometimes visible.

Although many of the sculptures decorating the palace depicted magical spirits, away from the main central door and buttresses the scenes in the courtyard were secular. This scene was part of series showing a group of foreigners bringing tribute. Their dress shows that they were from the west. The turban suggests one man is from north-western Syria, his clenched fists are a token of submission. At this time Assyria was expanding westward to acquired booty and tribute from states in the geographical region of Syria. The man with monkeys may be Phoenician. They bring luxury goods and status symbols. The monkeys may have come from Egypt or from the lands of southern Arabia from which incense was imported.

Mesopotamian kings prided themselves in the collections of exotic animals they acquired as booty or tribute. Monkeys were popular animals in the art of Mesopotamia. They were often depicted playing musical instruments, perhaps representing animals accompanying travelling entertainers. 

Source: British Museum

(via asianhistory)

philamuseum:

As far as we’re concerned, there’s only one way to transport your dog in style, and that’s with an elaborate dog cage like this one. With intricate enameling, gilded dragons, and white jade rings, this cage is fit for the most pampered pooch.Dog Cage (Goulong), late 18th–19th century, China

philamuseum:

As far as we’re concerned, there’s only one way to transport your dog in style, and that’s with an elaborate dog cage like this one. With intricate enameling, gilded dragons, and white jade rings, this cage is fit for the most pampered pooch.

Dog Cage (Goulong), late 18th–19th century, China

(via asianhistory)


amnhnyc:

This fearsome 17-foot-long Xiphactinus audax is ready for #FossilFriday!
Alive during the Late Cretaceous (about 85 million years ago), Xiphactinus and its relatives were large predators with strong jaws and many teeth. Xiphactinus swam in the great inland sea that covered most of North America at the end of the Age of Dinosaurs. This specimen was collected in Lane County, Kansas. 
Find Xiphactinus in the Hall of Vertebrate Origins. 

amnhnyc:

This fearsome 17-foot-long Xiphactinus audax is ready for #FossilFriday!

Alive during the Late Cretaceous (about 85 million years ago), Xiphactinus and its relatives were large predators with strong jaws and many teeth. Xiphactinus swam in the great inland sea that covered most of North America at the end of the Age of Dinosaurs. This specimen was collected in Lane County, Kansas. 

Find Xiphactinus in the Hall of Vertebrate Origins




colorfulcuties:

urbanfieldnotes:

Vanessa Hong outside Cushnie et Ochs, New York
Photo by Brent Luvaas (www.urbanfieldnotes.com)

❤

colorfulcuties:

urbanfieldnotes:

Vanessa Hong outside Cushnie et Ochs, New York

Photo by Brent Luvaas (www.urbanfieldnotes.com)

(via fuckyeahpocfashion)